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Vaping advocates, particularly in the UK, were left outraged last week after repeated claims about Britain’s falling smoking rate made no mention of vapour products – or, indeed, any mention of harm reduction at all. Groups like ASH and Cancer Research gave all the credit to controversial measures they have advocated for, and ignored science-based methods.
According to research data released earlier this week by researchers from Penn State College of Medicine, vapers are less dependent on their electronic devices, than smokers are on combustible cigarettes.
For the first time, more than half of the UK's electronic-cigarette users have since given up smoking tobacco, a study suggests. Some 1.5 million vapers are ex-smokers, compared with 1.3 million who still use tobacco, a survey of 12,000 adults for Action on Smoking and Health found. But Ash said the message that vaping was much less harmful than smoking had not yet got through to all smokers.
Vaping has been endorsed by health experts after the first long-term study of its effects in ex-smokers. After six months, people who switched from real to e-cigarettes had far fewer toxins and cancer-causing substances in their bodies than continual smokers.
A study carried out in Connecticut shows that flavourings, especially menthol, are factors that may affect smoking behaviour and help smokers switch to vaping. Flavours, from the experience of many vapers and former smokers, are what made the difference when switching to vaping. The wide diversity of fragrances (about 8,000 according to recent projections) is part of the success of the e-cigarette, pretend vaping advocates. But this opinion is n
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